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Problem Solving Must-Reads: Caterer brings migrants and Parisians together

Plus: Storing data in DNA and a city focused on bettering the quality of the city, not growing

Problem Solving Must-Reads: Caterer brings migrants and Parisians together

Plus: Storing data in DNA and a city focused on bettering the quality of the city, not growing

Here at The Citizen, we do problem-solving journalism, looking for ideas and solutions to move the region forward and make a better city. Here are some other great ideas for solving the world’s problems, from media outlets around the globe:

French Catering Company Employs Refugees To Cook Their Native Foods

Les Cuistots Migrateurs — or “The Migrant Cooks” — are setting out to change French people’s perceptions of immigrants while providing job opportunities to refugees. The French catering company employs migrants and refugees to cook and serve their native foods to Parisians to share parts of their culture and begin to change the narrative around migration. France has granted over 19,500 refugees legal status over the past year, but those refugees haven’t exactly gotten a warm welcome. The hope is to begin to change this narrative by having the two groups mingle over food. (via Huffington Post)

The Thumb Drive Of The Future Is Made Of DNA

Photo: GOOD

When trying to protect saved photos and notes digitally, the mindset “Just back up your system constantly and pray it works” has been changed forever at the University of Washington. A team of researchers at the university stored 200 MB of data in synthetic DNA strands—around the same size as a Number 2 pencil tip. Granted, you can buy a USB drive online that stores 200 MB for a few bucks. But as this new technology develops, it may someday prove even more efficient than traditional methods. Data can now be kept at the bottom of a test tube in our very own building blocks of life. (via GOOD)

The City That Embraced Its Decline

Photo: CityLab

Youngtown, Ohio stopped trying to return to its glory days as a bustling city with the mindset that maybe smaller is better. The city reoriented the former steel-mill town with a focus in providing services to neighborhoods with the most people, converting abandoned land into green space, and supporting the up-and-coming healthcare industry in the area. The city has shifted its focus from the people it wanted to attract to the people that already live there. (via CityLab)

Header photo: Huffington Post

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