NEWSLETTER SIGNUP

By signing up to our newsletter, you agree to our terms.

Do Something

Pitch Philly to Amazon

Do you agree that Philadelphia would be the perfect location for Amazon’s new headquarters? Pitch your reasons why or why not. Send them to us via Twitter, below in the comments or you can email us at info@thephiladelphiacitizen.org. We’ll share our favorites via social media.

Connect WITH OUR SOCIAL ACTION TEAM



Video

Mayor Kenney's pitch to Amazon on Bloomberg

The Amazon Follies

Is the Kenney administration creative enough to make the sale?

Is the Kenney administration creative enough to make the sale?

“When all think alike, then no one is thinking.”

—Walter Lippman

I’ve been thinking a lot about ol’ Wally’s observation ever since our city government embarked on the much-ballyhooed pitch to bring Amazon’s second headquarters to Philly. Winning the reality TV-like sweepstakes would no doubt be a game-changer for our city and region, and not just for its addition of 50,000 jobs to the local economy; the psychic benefits of becoming Amazon’s second home might be just as crucial. Perhaps it would be the final piece we need to get our swagger back, to once and for all bury the last vestiges of Negadelphia.

But, in the last week or two, the whispers have grown louder: Are our elected leaders—so accustomed to playing small ball, so wedded to incrementalism—up to making the bold case demanded of a moonshot moment?

The first red flag came when it was reported that Harold Epps, the city’s Commerce Director, and John Grady, President of PIDC, the city’s public-private economic development corporation, would lead the effort to win the Amazon windfall, with help from Select Greater Philadelphia, the region’s business attraction nonprofit. This isn’t a knock on Epps, Grady or Select’s Matt Cabrey; they’re all highly competent, and local patriots.

This story made possible by our members.
Become a member today

But is this just the recruitment of a company to our region, or is it something more akin to public spectacle, something that requires an approach that deviates from business as usual, and that differentiates us from the way all other cities may respond to Amazon’s challenge?

The latter is how Pittsburgh seems to see it. Steel city stakeholders—city government, foundations, nonprofits—immediately ponied up $248,000 to hire Maya Design, which is owned by the prestigious Boston Consulting Group, to honcho the city’s bid. Maya helped Pittsburgh apply for—and almost win—a $50 million Smart City Challenge transportation grant last year. The face of their bid will be a team of executives and civic leaders.

Now, given the conditions laid out in the RFP, it seems clear that we stand a better chance on the merits than does our western rival. But shouldn’t we match their boldness in our approach? Instead of governmental paper pushers, shouldn’t the faces of our bid be, I don’t know, Penn President Amy Gutmann? Startup pied piper Bob Moul? Comcast’s Brian Roberts? (There’s been some media speculation that Comcast doesn’t want Amazon invading its turf; I don’t buy it. Surely the town is big enough for both, no?)

You like turnarounds, Jeff Bezos? (See Post, Washington.) How’d you like to be the guy who brings back the city that gave birth to American Democracy, and in the process strikes a blow for the transformative effect of business?

Instead, it seems the city’s approach is decidedly top down. An email went out earlier this week to many of the city’s bold-face name innovators and entrepreneurs from Lauren Cox, the Commerce Department’s Manager of Communications and Press Relations. “As leaders of the Philadelphia tech community, each of you will play an important role as we develop a proposal and pitch our city as the home for Amazon’s HQ2…” she wrote. “…I will be your main point of contact for all things Amazon.”

Cox goes on to ask recipients to “contribute some ‘big ideas’ that could potentially be incorporated into the comms plans and/or proposal,” before asking: “Do you think we should involve drones?”

The entrepreneur who forwarded me this communique had this to say: “You have the city controlling this, as opposed to the city saying, ‘This isn’t what we do. Let’s hire the best that does this and say to them, What do you need?’” He contrasted our approach with Pittsburgh’s: “They said to themselves, ‘We think we have the ingredients to be a global city. Let’s hire the Boston Consulting Group to help us craft that story.’”

But it goes even deeper than that. It’s not just about who is making the pitch—it’s also about what that pitch is. Remember Wally Lippman’s advice, uttered some 50 years before Steve Jobs implored us to Think Different. Here’s where you wish the Kenney administration would set itself apart from every other city in the Amazon competition by thinking more creatively.

Every city seeking the Amazon nod will try and sell Jeff Bezos on an array of inducements targeted to his bottom line. An orgy of tax breaks will be thrown his way. As will a list of attractive demographic and cultural amenities, as Drexel President and Chamber Chairman John Fry so ably laid out in an Inquirer op-ed.

How about this: Let’s stipulate that we’ll match all the inducements others are sending Amazon’s way, but that the heart of our pitch isn’t what we can do for you, Amazon. It’s what you can do for us.

You like turnarounds, Jeff Bezos? (See Post, Washington.) How’d you like to be the guy who brings back the city that gave birth to American Democracy, and in the process strikes a blow for the transformative effect of business? In the New York Times, Ross Douthat argued in favor of an Amazon Detroit:

“The political backdrop, the growing suspicion on right and left about whether big tech serves the common good, raises an interesting question: What if Amazon treated their headquartering decision as an act of corporate citizenship, part public relations stunt and part genuinely patriotic gesture?” Douthat writes. “What if it approached the decision as an opportunity to push back against trends driving populist suspicion of big business…the sense that the New Economy creates wealth but not jobs and that its tycoons are loyal to globalization rather than their country?”

“You have the city controlling this, as opposed to the city saying, ‘This isn’t what we do. Let’s hire the best that does this and say to them, ‘What do you need?’” says one local entrepreneur.

Douthat is right on the argument, but wrong on the city choice. Detroit already has Dan Gilbert leading its charge of reinvention. But why not say to Bezos: How’d you like to be our Dan Gilbert?

Look, we’re already the center of social impact entrepreneurship, even if the city, still wedded to Ben Franklin and cheesesteaks, doesn’t market ourselves that way. Philly invented the B Corp revolution thanks to the nonprofit B Lab —whose local founders, Jay Coen-Gilbert and Bart Houlahan, should be in on the pitch. What if our presentation to Amazon wasn’t a sales pitch, per se, but an invitation to come here and fuel a new American Revolution? One built around the transformative effects of conscious capitalism?

Hell, we could say, we’ll throw tax breaks your way like all the other cities, but we’re also asking something big of you, something bigger than your bottom line: Come here and help fix our schools. Maybe that involves donating to them, or adopting them, or mentoring at-risk youth. But providing jobs isn’t enough. We’re responding to your challenge, Amazon, by challenging you:  Come here and make all of us better.

Now that would be some different thinking.

Header Photo: Jason Redmond

The Philadelphia Citizen will only publish thoughtful, civil posts. We want to be a communal space. But that doesn’t mean you have a First Amendment right to be an idiot. Send us an insulting, offensive and/or wildly off-topic comment and not only will we refrain from posting it -- we will laugh at you before we hit delete.

Recent Tweets
@THEPHILACITIZEN

@thephilacitizen @@thephilacitizen
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
Discuss gentrification and more, this week. Our weekly Do Something guides are like the cheat codes to activism. https://t.co/IRBIxBKoYB 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
The CEO and co-founder of @Houwzer is challenging traditional home buying practices—while seeking to do good.… https://t.co/w0q6nCNZyg 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
Last week, @Eagles defeated the @Panthers & All-Pro safety @MalcolmJenkins argued for cash bail reform. Read here. https://t.co/mQSUoDFrdR 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
The Wall of Action at our Civic Impact Birthday party last week was a huge success! Here's what you missed. https://t.co/5BALmBzcfm 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
"Only about 10% of congressional house seats are now considered competitive, meaning either party might win them." https://t.co/ZXtTE32C54 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
"Soda tax opponents suggested that those payments led the local NAACP to reverse opposition to the soda tax." https://t.co/zvwmQHyFYl 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
"City education reformers should see this as a chance to start thinking about how to get the city’s act together" https://t.co/cjrNtkbJso 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
The Fellowship national convening of black educators conference runs through this Sunday. #Philly #staywoke https://t.co/jjjihuyVOm 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
Monday, @MalcolmJenkins hosts the 4th Annual Blitz, Bow-Ties & Bourbon Fundraiser for the Young Dragons program. https://t.co/Gu1pzjFFKh 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
"But it’s not just inmates whose lives are changed with these programs. The dogs’ lives are too." #Reentry https://t.co/Rems6kHY5x 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
Our Civic Impact Birthday Party was catered by @Philabundance 's Community Kitchen. Learn more about them here. https://t.co/EzLvB3zE5v 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
How do we fight back against Philadelphia corruption that's technically legal? https://t.co/HDNXxe9F8K 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
Should we approach gun law reform the same way we fought Big Tobacco?@onwurd speaks with Dwight Evans on the topic. https://t.co/8OuZb9iRQK 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
"The significance of the Supreme court hearing the Wisconsin case cannot be exaggerated." #gerrymandering #Philly https://t.co/ZXtTE32C54 

LOAD MORE

Be a Citizen Editor

Suggest a Story