Meet the Disruptor: AnaOno

After surviving breast cancer, Dana Donofree used her experience to launch a bra company for others like her, who want to feel sexy and feminine again

By Annie McDonough

Do Something: Catch the Eclipse

View the solar eclipse and learn about astronomy in the process. Plus, talk homelessness, clean up the river, and more ways to be an awesome citizen this week.

By Annie McDonough

Do Something: Call for Social Change

Attend Knits, Locks & Twists, a conference to inspire women of color as they move to change their world. Plus, stroll for school supplies, plan for climate action, and more ways to be an awesome citizen this week.

By Annie McDonough

Do Something: Provide Relief for Refugees

Assemble refugee relief kits for families in need across the world. Plus, explore vegan Philadelphia, rally for climate solutions, and more ways to be an awesome citizen this week.

By Annie McDonough

Do Something: Picnic with Diplomacy

Have a picnic and build international bridges. Plus, celebrate black films, feed the hungry, and more ways to be an awesome citizen this week.

By Annie McDonough

Meet the Disruptor: Paratodo

A young local fashion designer is upending the industry by making his clothes locally—and giving a piece of his profits to charity

By Annie McDonough

Do Something: Go Downward Dog

Do some vinyasas with your new adopted dog. Plus, learn about voter disenfranchisement, discuss healthcare solutions, and more ways to be an awesome citizen this week.

By Annie McDonough

Do Something: Cycle, Cruise and Brews

Bike and cruise to support a new greenway. Plus, join the Philadelphia Citizen to mingle with local disruptors, grab a beer with Sen. Casey, and more ways to be an awesome citizen this week.

By Annie McDonough

Do Something: Find Common Ground

Explore urban forestry, raise money for education, go all Lebowski on cancer, and more ways to be an awesome citizen this week.

By Annie McDonough

Citizen of the Week: The Food Connector

Megha Kulshreshtha launched an app that bridges a disturbing gap between the food wasted by restaurants and Philadelphians who go hungry

By Annie McDonough