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Problem Solving Must-Reads: Muslim Service Undaunted by Trump

Plus: an building an actual bridge between wealthy and poor neighborhoods, and transforming rural agriculture through gender equality training

Problem Solving Must-Reads: Muslim Service Undaunted by Trump

Plus: an building an actual bridge between wealthy and poor neighborhoods, and transforming rural agriculture through gender equality training

The anti-immigrant rhetoric that President-elect Donald Trump’s used during the Presidential election campaign caused alarm among America’s immigrant communities. Muslims were a particular focus of his anti-immigration rhetoric in many of his speeches.

Mr. Trump’s election seems to have emboldened some into committing acts of violence against immigrants and Muslims. A spate of hate crimes and incidents of hatred and violence against minorities have been reported across the country. This has left many in the immigrant community worried and fearful. Members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community of Fredericksburg, Maryland have sadly become familiar with incidents of hate being directed towards them. Some members in their community have been verbally abused and have even been spat on.

Despite being fearful and not knowing what to expect the day after the election, several women from the Ahmadiyya Muslim community in Fredericksburg decided to continue to volunteer at a downtown soup kitchen. While many across the country were protesting a Trump presidency; in keeping with teachings of their faith, these women feel that service to the community would be the best way to resist intolerance.

Read the full story here (via Frederick News Post)

Here’s what else we’re reading:

Bridging D.C.'s Starkest Divide

Like many cities across the United States, Washington DC is deeply divided along racial and economic lines. Two neighborhoods along the Anacostia river are a microcosm for the urban disparity that can be seen nationwide. On the west side of the river is the wealthy, white neighborhood of Navy Yard, while on the east side sits poor, overwhelmingly black Anacostia and Congress Heights. A non-profit called Building Bridges Across the River has come up with a unique solution to address the disparity between the neighborhoods. It plans to transform an old freeway bridge into a unique elevated public park. This park is to be a civic space for recreation, education and the arts, which will bring the two neighborhoods together. (via Next City)

Nurturing Women Leaders in Honduras

Women play an important role in agriculture in developing countries. However, rural women continue to produce lower yields and receive lower income—not because they lack skill, but because they do not have access to resources and opportunities that they need to be more productive. In Honduras, in order to empower women and provide them with access to land, fertilizer, education and financial services, Lutheran World Relief has implemented an initiative which brings men and women together and trains them to advocate for policies which focus on gender equity. This has proven to be an essential step in women’s empowerment and sustainable development in agriculture in Honduras. (via Huffington Post)

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