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Problem Solving Must-Reads: Free Lawyers For Low Income Tenants

Plus: New York City's continued attempts to innovate public services, and a bicycle helmet with an airbag

Problem Solving Must-Reads: Free Lawyers For Low Income Tenants

Plus: New York City's continued attempts to innovate public services, and a bicycle helmet with an airbag

Here at The Citizen, we do problem-solving journalism, looking for ideas and solutions to move the region forward and make a better city. Here are some other great ideas for solving the world’s problems, from media outlets around the globe:

NYC Looks to Build on Public-Private Tech Successes

Photo: FastCo.Exist

On Tuesday, New York City’s Office of Tech and Innovation announced two public initiatives meant to generate ideas from the private sector on how best to innovate the services that the city provides. These are the third and fourth official “Calls for innovation” that Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration has formally launched. The last time the city launched such an initiative, a campaign called LinkNYC—which uses old telephone infrastructure to create a citywide, public Wifi network—was created. (via FastCo.Exist)

Should Bike Helmets Be Equipped With Airbags?

Photo: CityLab

A group of Stanford researchers recently took to the lab to determine whether a new helmet design could benefit the 500,000 Americans who go to the emergency room each year as a result of bicycling accidents. The researchers compared the Swedish-made Hövding helmet—which uses what is effectively an airbag in order to mitigate the effects of a crash—with a traditional bicycle helmet. Their findings: cyclists wearing the Hövding are eight times less likely to sustain a concussion during a crash than cyclists wearing traditional helmets. (via CityLab)

Low-Income Tenants in D.C. May Get Free Legal Help

Photo: Next City

Councilmember Kenyan McDuffie has introduced a piece of legislation to the District Council of Washington, D.C., that would provide free legal counsel to low-income tenants in housing disputes. According to the D.C. Legal Aid Society, 94 percent of landlords in the district have legal representation as opposed to just five percent of tenants. If passed, the Expanding Access to Justice Act of 2016 would guarantee legal representation for tenants at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty line. (via Next City)

Photo header: Flickr

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