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CitizenCast: Mayor Pete Could Be Your Next President

The Citizen hosted South Bend’s Pete Buttigieg in 2019. In the wake of the Iowa caucus this week, listen here for his vision of America’s future

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Pete Buttigieg, 38-year-old presidential candidate and mayor of South Bend, Indiana, has been many things: a Rhodes Scholar. A Navy intelligence officer, deployed—during his mayoral tenure—to Afghanistan. The husband of a man, making him one of few openly gay politicians in America. An author, of the best-selling memoir Shortest Way Home.

And now, a 2020 presidential candidate, who got a boost on Monday during the Iowa caucus.

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In 2019, The Citizen hosted an intimate conversation between “Mayor Pete”—it’s “boot-edge-edge,” by the way—and Drexel’s Nowak Metro Finance Lab Director Bruce Katz, about how the work being done in cities can translate to national policy; what it means to truly be a country that works for all its residents; and how our politics has to become about making democracy do its best work—not about the power that goes along with, well, being in power.

As Katz put it in a recent column: “Cities have emerged as the vanguard of problem solving in the United States and beyond … cities are networks, not governments, and mayors possess a form of soft power that enables them to convene local stakeholders around pressing issues.”

Listen to Buttigieg talk about his experience in South Bend here: