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Women’s History Month

All-Star #6: Lucretia Mott

Women’s History Month

All-Star #6: Lucretia Mott

A governor. The world’s first computer programmers. Lawyers, doctors, writers, artists and activists. Philadelphia’s history is full of incredible, history-making women whose stories, unfortunately, are often all but missing from the history books.

It shouldn’t take a dedicated month—Women’s History Month—to recognize the contributions of these heroines. But in honor of the occasion, we scoured history to find several badass Philly women to celebrate for our Women’s History Month All-Stars.

RELATED: A cadre of visionary women are behind Guild House Hotel—a newly opened boutique hotel that celebrates the history residing in our buildings by giving props to the early feminists who initially occupied the property.

06

Lucretia Mott

Feminist / abolitionist

Lucretia Mott

Feminist / abolitionist

1793-1880

Lucretia Mott, a Quaker feminist and abolitionist, is best known for her contributions to the women’s suffrage movement and her collaboration with Elizabeth Cady Stanton in organizing the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848. After the convention she continued speaking on women’s rights and published a book, Discourse on Women, a history of women’s oppression.

In addition to her advocacy for women’s rights, Mott also fought for the end of slavery, helping to found the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society and, later, becoming the first president of the American Equal Rights Association.

Mott was one of the founders of Swarthmore College, instrumental in the college being co-ed from its start.

EDUCATION

  • Quaker boarding school in upstate NY


ACCOMPLISHMENTS

  • Published Discourse on Women (1850)
  • Helped form Free Religious Association in Boston 1867
  • Helped found Philadephia Female Anti-Slavery Society in 1833
  • First president of American Equal Rights Association
  • Helped found Swarthmore College in 1864


FINAL WORDS
: A fierce advocate for women’s rights, Mott once said “The world has never yet seen a truly great and virtuous nation because, in the degradation of women, the very fountains of life are poisoned at their source.”


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