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Philadelphia Women’s History Month All-Stars

All-Star #6: Lucretia Mott

Philadelphia Women’s History Month All-Stars

All-Star #6: Lucretia Mott

Scientists. Activists. Lawyers. Artists. The first computer programmers.

The history books may have neglected some of the incredible Philly women who changed the world over the last 200-plus years—but we have not.

While it shouldn’t take a national observance to put women on our radar, this is one holiday we’re happy to play along with: Every weekday during Women’s History Month, we’re highlighting a local woman whose legacy deserves celebrating—and who continues to inspire us.

Find the full list below—and also check out the incredible women we included in our Black History Month All-Stars roundup—like Marian Anderson, Sadie Alexander and Caroline Still Anderson.

06

Lucretia Mott

Feminist / abolitionist

Lucretia Mott

Feminist / abolitionist

1793-1880

Lucretia Mott, a Quaker feminist and abolitionist, is best known for her contributions to the women’s suffrage movement and her collaboration with Elizabeth Cady Stanton in organizing the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848. After the convention she continued speaking on women’s rights and published a book, Discourse on Women, a history of women’s oppression.

In addition to her advocacy for women’s rights, Mott also fought for the end of slavery, helping to found the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society and, later, becoming the first president of the American Equal Rights Association.

Mott was one of the founders of Swarthmore College, instrumental in the college being co-ed from its start.

EDUCATION

  • Quaker boarding school in upstate NY


ACCOMPLISHMENTS

  • Published Discourse on Women (1850)
  • Helped form Free Religious Association in Boston 1867
  • Helped found Philadephia Female Anti-Slavery Society in 1833
  • First president of American Equal Rights Association
  • Helped found Swarthmore College in 1864


FINAL WORDS
: A fierce advocate for women’s rights, Mott once said “The world has never yet seen a truly great and virtuous nation because, in the degradation of women, the very fountains of life are poisoned at their source.”


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