NEWSLETTER SIGNUP

Do Something: Teach Racial Justice in the Time of Trump

Educators discuss teaching racial justice during a Trump presidency. Plus, discuss multicultural democracy in the Trump years, support emerging artists at the PAFA Student Print Sale and more ways to rock out your citizenship this week.

Do Something: Teach Racial Justice in the Time of Trump

Educators discuss teaching racial justice during a Trump presidency. Plus, discuss multicultural democracy in the Trump years, support emerging artists at the PAFA Student Print Sale and more ways to rock out your citizenship this week.

Every Monday we round up a handful of fun ways to get involved throughout the week to make your city better. Have ideas for upcoming events? Email tips here.

Talk Teaching in the Time of Trump

According to Teacher Action Group: Philadelphia, the election results have many local teachers “in a state of heightened emotional distress,” aware that promoting racial justice in their classrooms is now more important than ever. During the Educating in the Time of Trump discussion panel at YouthBuild Philadelphia, educators can gather in a safe space to share their concerns and discuss with other teachers how to accomplish their goals. After the group back-and-forth, a second portion of the evening allows participants to organize in groups “based on their connection to education,” giving, say, elementary school teachers the chance to talk amongst one another while high school or college teachers convene in another group. Tuesday, November 29, 5:30-7:30 p.m., free, YouthBuild Philadelphia Charter School, 1231 N. Broad Street. 

Hear One of Our Writers Live

Reporter Emma Eisenberg has penned stories for The Citizen about local disruptors, like the Philadelphia Youth Poetry Movement’s Vision Divirgilio and Meg Ferrigno, who opened Ahimsa House, a center of nonviolence in West Philadelphia. She’s also made the case for smart ideas Philadelphia should adopt, including compulsory voting and eliminating bail for nonviolent crimes. Besides writing for us, she’s also written for sites like Salon, Slate and The New Republic. On Tuesday night, you can hear an example of some of her fiction work at a reading at Kelly Writers’ House. She’ll read an excerpt from a new novel she’s working on about two queer women living as roommates in South Philadelphia. She’ll be joined by Sam Allingham, a teacher at Temple University, who recently published a short story collection called “The Great American Songbook.” Philadelphia plays a prominent role in the anthology, which takes an ambitious dive into the history of music. Tuesday, November 29, 6-7 p.m., free, Kelly Writers House, 3805 Locust Walk.

Discuss the Future of Multicultural Democracy

While President-elect Donald Trump seems to be dialing back some of the hateful rhetoric that defined his unprecedented campaign, minority groups continue to feel shaken, worried that years of progress surrounding the rights of racial, sexual and ethnic minorities will have been for naught. This week, Penn Arts & Sciences hosts a discussion panel about forging a way for multicultural democracy during the Trump years. A team of Penn scholars will cover everything from ways to handle emboldened white nationalists and the rise of hate speech and violence in the wake of Trump’s nomination to what will become of millions of undocumented immigrants who have made homes for themselves in our city and across the States. Thursday, December 1, 4:30 p.m., free, Houston Hall at the University of Pennsylvania, 3417 Spruce Street. 

Support Local Emerging Artists

Our communities couldn’t thrive without our artists—whether they be street artists wheat-pasting thought-provoking images on our city streets, or musicians writing songs that open our eyes to issues affecting our poorest communities. Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA)’s annual Student Print Sale offers the chance to support some of these local emerging creatives—and snag some one-of-a-kind artwork for your home. The one-day-only sale features work created by students enrolled in PAFA’s printmaking program—from etchings and screen prints to woodcuts and lithographs—all priced under $150. To an artist, nothing says “keep doing what you’re doing” more than trading something you created for cold hard cash. And who knows, you just may play a hand in lifting up the next Banksy, Shepard Fairey or JR. Friday, December 2, 5:30-8:30 p.m., pay as you go, 6th floor of PAFA’s Samuel M.V. Hamilton Building, 128 N. Broad Street. 

Raise Up Your Lighters for Ladies Rock Philly

Wrap up your week with a musical revue showcasing transgender and gender non-binary/genderqueer artists involved in Girls Rock Philly‘s rock camp for those 19 and over, Ladies Rock Camp. The concert features original songs written by the campers at the weekend day camp held earlier this fall. The theme for the gathering is “building liberatory futures through song and joy,” so expect soul-stirring anthems and lively DJ sets by a group of artists emboldened by the camaraderie and perhaps particularly fired up by the recent election results. Proceeds from the event—and drink and merchandise sales—benefit Girls Rock Philly’s mission to use music to empower young girls and women across the region. Sunday, December 4, 7:30 p.m., $5-$10 (sliding scale), PhilaMOCA, 531 N. 12th Street. 

Header Photo by Flickr/U.S. Department of Education

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