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Problem Solving Must-Reads: Zero-Emission Hydrogen Trains

Plus: A case against homework, and a novel study on the effects of sugar-sweetened beverages

Problem Solving Must-Reads: Zero-Emission Hydrogen Trains

Plus: A case against homework, and a novel study on the effects of sugar-sweetened beverages

Here at The Citizen, we do problem-solving journalism, looking for ideas and solutions to move the region forward and make a better city. Here are some other great ideas for solving the world’s problems, from media outlets around the globe:

Germany unveils zero-emissions train that only emits steam

Photo: Alstom

Germany will introduce the world’s first zero-emission train, which can travel almost 500 miles per day at speeds up to 87 mph. Instead of emitting diesel fuel like the rest of Germany’s 4,000 trains, the Coradia iLint runs on hydrogen. As a result, the trains only emit excess steam into the atmosphere—creating an environmentally-friendly alternative. Powered by massive lithium ion batteries, the train gets its energy from a hydrogen fuel tank atop the passenger cars. The trains won’t be ready for passenger use until December 2017, but other European countries like Denmark, the Netherlands and Norway have shown interest in these zero-emissions hydrails. (via Independent)

Why Even Teachers Want to Get Rid of Homework

Photo: Flickr

If a student has too little homework, parents worry that their kid is falling behind. But if a child has too much homework, it creates anxiety for both the student and the parents. In the U.S., the amount of homework being assigned to the average nine-year-old student has been increasing in recent years. In 2014, the number of nine-year-olds with no homework fell 13 percent. Many teachers throughout the United States are realizing that too much homework hinders a student’s abilities in the classroom, so now many are implementing a “no-more-than-necessary” approach to homework. (via GOOD)

Removing Sugary Drinks, and Studying the Effects

The University of California, San Francisco removed all sugar-sweetened beverages from its campus—including from every store, food truck and vending machine. The health sciences center with more than 24,000 employees made this decision for the health of its employees, but in the meantime realized they had the perfect conditions to study those employees who were drinking large amounts of soda and other sugary beverages. Researchers have registered 214 of the university’s employees into a rigorous study that collects blood samples to see if there are any major metabolic changes from the lack of sugary-drink intake. The university has already seen in a survey of 2,500 employees that workers have significantly dropped sugary drinks from their diets. (via Huffington Post)

Photo header: Alstom

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