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Problem Solving Must-Reads: Protecting North Dakota Protesters with Facebook

Plus: Australia's drought lesson for California, and mobile grocery stores to bring bok choy to DC's Chinatown again

Problem Solving Must-Reads: Protecting North Dakota Protesters with Facebook

Plus: Australia's drought lesson for California, and mobile grocery stores to bring bok choy to DC's Chinatown again

Here at The Citizen, we do problem-solving journalism, looking for ideas and solutions to move the region forward and make a better city. Here are some other great ideas for solving the world’s problems, from media outlets around the globe:

For DC Chinatown's Oldest Residents, a Mobile Market Brings Back the Bok Choy

Photo: City Lab

The last full-service Asian supermarket closed in 2005 in Washington, D.C.’s Chinatown. Without one close by, elderly people in the area are unable to find many healthy and affordable food options that they know how to cook. A mobile market by nonprofit Arcadia Farms—a Virginia-based nonprofit bringing low-income people healthy food through mobile food markets—is fixing this by parking their mobile store outside the 153-unit affordable housing complex in Chinatown to bring many of the elderly the options to purchase nutritious options. (via City Lab)

Australia’s Lesson for a Thirsty California

If Australian agencies didn’t come together, the city of Melbourne would have run out of water in 2009. But Australian water companies, government agencies, businesses and its own citizens teamed up to make sure that didn’t happen. Through a multi-faceted approach from all parties (and some mandatory restrictions on outdoor water use), the city reduced its yearly demand and saved 28 billion gallons of water. Water use per person per day dropped from 65 gallons to 39 gallons. By teaming up, and making sure the water-saving program was created with the citizens instead of direct at them, the city was successful in saving their reservoirs. California would be wise to employ a similar strategy as it fights seemingly constant drought conditions. (via The New York Times)

The Reason Everyone On Facebook Is Checking In To North Dakota

Photo: The Atlantic

Thousands of people have been checking in to Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North Dakota. It’s possible you’ve seen it yourself among your Facebook friends, but don’t worry—your friend most likely hasn’t gone to the hotly contested area. There is strong suspicion that the local police department near Standing Rock is tracking protesters (or “water protectors” as they title themselves) who are camping out at the reservation and arresting those who have been checking in on Facebook at the location. The protesters are there, taking on a giant of an issue: they oppose the North Dakota Access Pipeline that would go beneath the reservation’s water supply. So, in an effort to confuse those police officers, remote supporters are checking in on Facebook to make it more difficult for police to know who’s really there and who isn’t. (via GOOD)

Photo header: The Atlantic

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