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Problem Solving Must-Reads: Use-of-Force Restrictions on Police Prove Effective

Plus: Transforming alleyways into public space, and a tiny pantry providing food and supplies to those in need

Problem Solving Must-Reads: Use-of-Force Restrictions on Police Prove Effective

Plus: Transforming alleyways into public space, and a tiny pantry providing food and supplies to those in need

Here at The Citizen, we do problem-solving journalism, looking for ideas and solutions to move the region forward and make a better city. Here are some other great ideas for solving the world’s problems, from media outlets around the globe:

Campaign Zero’s New Report: Standards On Police Use Of Force Actually Work

Photo: BuzzFeed News

A new report has found that police departments that implement use-of-force restrictions experience significantly fewer officer-involved killings than do departments without such restrictions. According to the report, which was released by criminal justice advocacy group Campaign Zero, use-of-force restrictions resulted in 72 percent fewer officer-involved killings. Despite this new data—and the existence of other reports that drew similar conclusions—the Fraternal Order of Police continues to resist the implementation of these guidelines. (via BuzzFeed News)

Vancouver Is Making Vibrant Public Spaces Out of Back Alleys

Photo: Next City

A pilot project called “More Awesome Now” is transforming alleyways throughout Vancouver into colorful public spaces replete with foosball courts and café patios. Thanks to $200,000 in seed funding from the Downtown Vancouver Business Improvement Association (DVBIA), the city, and a local architecture firm, the initiative has made rapid progress. Public pedestrian areas in Vancouver could increase by as much as 30% thanks to the project, another benefit of reimagining city alleyways. (via Next City)

Little Pantry On Street Invites People To Leave Goods For Those In Need

An Arkansas citizen created The Little Free Pantry in order to provide food and household supplies to those most in need. The concept is wonderfully simple: At any time, anyone can donate items to—or retrieve items from—the cupboard-sized pantry. Inspired by the Little Free Libraries campaign, McClard seems to have started a phenomenon of her own, as similar pantries have opened up in small towns throughout the south. (via Huffington Post)

Photo header: Flickr

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