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Problem Solving Must-Reads: Uber copycat fills Nebraska transit gap

Plus: A $150 plan to end systemic racism, and using Pokemon Go to raise money for nonprofits

Problem Solving Must-Reads: Uber copycat fills Nebraska transit gap

Plus: A $150 plan to end systemic racism, and using Pokemon Go to raise money for nonprofits

Here at The Citizen, we do problem-solving journalism, looking for ideas and solutions to move the region forward and make a better city. Here are some other great ideas for solving the world’s problems, from media outlets around the globe:

A $150 Billion Plan To End Racism Just Got Some Serious Backing

Photo: GOOD

Social justice organization We Are Here has Rihanna, Beyonce, Alicia Keys and even Bono backing it to end racism. These celebrities are fed up—and are providing people with outlets to push for Congress and President Obama to act on racial inequality. The group is pushing for a “moonshot” to curb systemic racism, asking for $150 billion to be directed at poor communities over the next 10 years. The money would provide equal access to education, healthcare, quality housing, job training, nutrition and an overhaul of the criminal justice system in America. (via GOOD)

How an Uber Copycat Can Fill the Transit Gap in Rural Nebraska

Photo: CityLab

Ride-sharing services aren’t too interested in rural areas. That’s why a local company in the panhandle of Nebraska has decided to create a copycat Uber to fill the transit gap in their area. Many people this area don’t have cars—so getting to a grocery store or going to the doctor can take hours, and the nearest form of public transportation can be 60 miles away. Ride-hailing app Liberty has created jobs for those who have cars—and keeps the cost of the app down for low-income users. The fare will be close to a dollar per mile, and drivers get to keep 80 percent of the total charge. (via CityLab)

You Can Use Pokémon Go To Raise Money For Charity

A lot has come out of app Pokémon Go so far—new friends, sprained ankles and even a romantic relationship. Now, Pokémon trainers are being challenged to raise money for nonprofits during their travels through the app Charity Miles. Money is raised for these nonprofits by tracking the distance they walk, run or bike—and the app then donates the funds to a nonprofit on the user’s behalf. Just by keeping Charity Miles open in the background of their phone, Pokémon Go players can chase Pikachu and raise money for charity. (via Huffington Post)

Photo header: CityLab

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