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Problem Solving Must-Reads: Supervised Injection Facilities

Plus: Food stamps online and a ban on styrofoam in San Francisco

Problem Solving Must-Reads: Supervised Injection Facilities

Plus: Food stamps online and a ban on styrofoam in San Francisco

Here at The Citizen, we do problem-solving journalism, looking for ideas and solutions to move the region forward and make a better city. Here are some other great ideas for solving the world’s problems, from media outlets around the globe:

Thrive Market wants to be a Whole Foods for online shoppers on food stamps

Photo: Mashable

Despite the amount of food deserts across the country and grocery stores that have high-tech delivering services, the two never seem to coincide. Thrive Market is trying to fix this by making food stamps available online so those who don’t have access to organic, nutritious foods can have them delivered to their homes. Thrive Market aims to be the Whole Foods for food stamps. It’s definitely an uphill battle to get the movement for online food stamps going, but Thrive Market, national food nonprofits and celebrities are ready to take it on. (via Mashable)

Could Supervised Injections Help San Francisco's Homeless Drug Users?

Photo: CityLab

At first, the idea of a supervised injection facility for those using injectable (and illegal) drugs sounds a bit problematic. But there are over 100 of these sites across the globe, and they’ve been found to reduce overdose deaths, decrease public blight and get more addicts into treatment. San Francisco is trying anything it can to cut back the overdose epidemic, and many signs are pointing to supervised injection sites as best practice. (via CityLab)

San Francisco Just Passed the Nation's Toughest Ban on Styrofoam

Photo: Mother Jones

Goodbye, box-packing friend. The sale of Styrofoam is officially banned in San Francisco because of its large contribution to plastic in the ocean. San Francisco aims to have “zero waste” by 2020 and is setting a standard nationally and internationally on steps to make the U.S. cleaner. Even with this Styrofoam ban, though, there’s still a long way to go—Americans use an estimated 25 billion foam cups alone each year. (via Mother Jones)

Header photo: CityLab

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