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Problem Solving Must-Reads: Registering Ex-Offenders To Vote

Plus: A tower in China that eats smog and emits clean air, and a glow-in-the-dark bike path aimed at reducing vehicular emissions

Problem Solving Must-Reads: Registering Ex-Offenders To Vote

Plus: A tower in China that eats smog and emits clean air, and a glow-in-the-dark bike path aimed at reducing vehicular emissions

Here at The Citizen, we do problem-solving journalism, looking for ideas and solutions to move the region forward and make a better city. Here are some other great ideas for solving the world’s problems, from media outlets around the globe:

The Chinese Tower That Sucks in Smog and Spits Out Clean Air

Photo: CityLab

Last week, Dutch designer Daan Roosegaarde unveiled a 23-foot-tall moveable tower in Beijing that sucks in smog and emits clean air. The tower releases positive ions into the air, which then attach to the kinds of particulate matter that threaten human health. The Chinese government is partnering with Roosegaarde in the coming year to tour the tower in cities throughout China, with a goal of eventually installing 800 more of these towers in the country. (via CityLab)

Glow-in-the-dark bike paths aim to make cycling safer

Photo: Upworthy

In late September, a Polish town debuted a glow-in-the-dark bicycle path in order to encourage commuters to bike more and to drive less—thereby lessening environmentally hazardous vehicle emissions. The path contains ‘luminophores’ that absorb sunlight during the daytime and glow for up to ten hours at night. If successful, the glow-in-the-dark path could be expanded dramatically and could ultimately serve as a model for cities worldwide. (via Upworthy)

One pool of voters is getting some attention: Ex-offenders

Photo: Philly.com

In Philadelphia, a campaign called #freetovote—spearheaded by the nonprofit Redeemed—seeks to register 20,000 ex-offenders to vote. Pennsylvania is among the nation’s most progressive states when it comes to voting laws; only presently incarcerated felons are prohibited from voting. Yet getting ex-offenders registered and out to the polls has proven to be a difficult task. If all 300,000 ex-offenders in Philadelphia were ultimately able to register, they would undoubtedly comprise a powerful voting block. (via Philly.com)

Photo header: Philly.com

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