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Problem Solving Must-Reads: Deconstructing Buildings Instead of Demolishing Them

Plus: Rochester's fight against stifling urban freeways, and the nationwide drop in teen pregnancies

Problem Solving Must-Reads: Deconstructing Buildings Instead of Demolishing Them

Plus: Rochester's fight against stifling urban freeways, and the nationwide drop in teen pregnancies

Here at The Citizen, we do problem-solving journalism, looking for ideas and solutions to move the region forward and make a better city. Here are some other great ideas for solving the world’s problems, from media outlets around the globe:

Burying a 1950s Planning Disaster

Photo: CityLab

The city of Rochester, New York is taking a stand against the disastrously planned urban freeways of the 1950s from which many American cities suffer. These freeways, whose construction often resulted in the condemnation of dozens of buildings and the division of longstanding communities, exacerbate traffic congestion and disrupt street networks. Today, Rochester is actively working to remove stretches of these public works debacles. (via CityLab)

Teen pregnancy rate has dropped 25% in recent years due to availability of contraceptives

Photo: Upworthy

Since 2007, teen pregnancy rates have been decreasing throughout the United States, due in large part to an increase in the availability of contraceptives. States like Colorado have enacted programs to provide long-term contraception free of charge, and many forms of birth control no longer require an insurance co-pay thanks to the Affordable Care Act. While this trend is encouraging, more education on the benefits of contraception is badly needed in many states. (via Upworthy)

Portland Promotes Deconstruction Over Demolition

Photo: Flickr

When buildings in Portland, Oregon reach the end of their lives, they are not demolished as are buildings elsewhere; they are deconstructed, brick by brick. Not only is deconstruction more environmentally friendly than demolition, but it also allows building components to be recycled and used in the construction of other buildings, thereby creating a unique cycle of sustainability. This summer, Portland passed an ordinance that greatly increases the number of buildings to be deconstructed—rather than demolished—when their end finally arrives. (via Next City)

Photo header: Next City

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