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Problem Solving Must-Reads: Oslo Is Pioneering The Fight Against Climate Change

Plus: Making American border patrol stations more welcoming, and the legislation making breakfast more accessible to American students

Problem Solving Must-Reads: Oslo Is Pioneering The Fight Against Climate Change

Plus: Making American border patrol stations more welcoming, and the legislation making breakfast more accessible to American students

Here at The Citizen, we do problem-solving journalism, looking for ideas and solutions to move the region forward and make a better city. Here are some other great ideas for solving the world’s problems, from media outlets around the globe:

The U.S. Is Making Its Border Stations More Welcoming

Photo: CityLab

The United States is investing heavily in its border control facilities, two of which were recently rewarded with a 2016 General Services Administration Design Award. Both the Mariposa Land Port of Entry in Nogales, Arizona, and the San Ysidro Land Port of Entry in San Ysidro, California, have undergone drastic transformations. What were once underwhelming bureaucratic offices now serve as humane facilities from which to process visitors and immigrants. Most importantly, these border stations have inspired similar transformations throughout the country. (via CityLab)

Feeding students breakfast by moving it from before the bell to after the bell

Photo: Upworthy

In the United States, over 13 million children come from food-insecure families. In 2015, 75 percent of public school teachers reported that they teach students who regularly come to school hungry. ‘Breakfast after bell’ bills are now being passed throughout the country in order to combat this phenomenon. Schools are no longer offering breakfast to those timely enough to arrive early—they are now making breakfast a fundamental part of the school day itself. (via Upworthy)

Oslo Is Taking an Extreme, Aggressive Approach to Climate Change

Photo: FastCo.Exist

While major American cities like New York plan to decrease emissions up to 80 percent by the year 2050, the city of Oslo, Norway, intends to take a more proactive approach to climate change. Oslo plans to cut its emissions in half—as compared to 1990 levels—in just four years. In 2015, the city banned private cars from the city center. This newfound initiative will require the remaining taxis and buses to abandon fossil fuels, and will establish new forms of infrastructure that reduce freight emissions. Moreover, the city will establish more bicycle lanes and will implement new parking restrictions. (via FastCo.Exist)

Photo header: FastCo.Exist

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