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Problem Solving Must-Reads: Detroit’s Growing Agrihood

Plus: Turns out more funding does lead to school success, and new architecture to address mass incarceration

Problem Solving Must-Reads: Detroit’s Growing Agrihood

Plus: Turns out more funding does lead to school success, and new architecture to address mass incarceration

The first urban agrihood will be built in Detroit to provide free produce to the neighborhood, churches, and food pantries around the area. An agrihood is an alternative neighborhood growth model that’s centered around agriculture, instead of the manufacturing that once thrived in Detroit. There have been agrihoods in rural areas before, but this is the first to grow—literally—in a city.

The Michigan Urban Farming Initiative’s new urban agrihood will span across three acres in Detroit’s North End. The initiative spearheading the agrihood isn’t stopping there: They’re working with other organizations and businesses like General Motors to create a top-notch, energy efficient and sustainable community resource center. Next door to the community resource center, on vacant land, will be a healthy cafe.

Once the agrihood and the community resource center are complete, a fire-damaged home on nearby property that has only the basement left will be made into a water-harvesting tank to irrigate the gardens.

Read the full story here (via Curbed: Detroit).

Here’s what else we’re reading:

It Turns Out Spending More Probably Does Improve Education

From the Department of Common Sense, states that have restructured the way schools are funded and increased funding for their poorest districts saw better academic improvement than those that haven’t. This is the same for longer-term outcomes, like how much students earned as adults, if more money had been spent in their districts. This has been the subject of heated political debate, and this new study may impact future funding lawsuits like the one in Pennsylvania. (via The New York Times)

Designing a Way out of Mass Incarceration

Photo: City Lab

A restorative justice firm in Oakland is developing an architectural response to lessen the mass incarceration problem facing America. The firm is working with currently incarcerated people to design new buildings to support restorative justice efforts and further the conversation about the root causes of imprisonment through design. (via City Lab)

Photo header: Curbed: Detroit

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