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Problem Solving Must-Reads: Become a mini-philanthropist

Plus: Bones to shape future cities and free school meals keeping farmers in business

Problem Solving Must-Reads: Become a mini-philanthropist

Plus: Bones to shape future cities and free school meals keeping farmers in business

Here at The Citizen, we do problem-solving journalism, looking for ideas and solutions to move the region forward and make a better city. Here are some other great ideas for solving the world’s problems, from media outlets around the globe:

Spotfund Lets You Become A Micro-Philanthropist At The Touch Of A Button

Photo: Fast CoExist

After binge-watching episodes of “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver” and “60 Minutes,” a group of Upper East Side roommates in New York often felt powerless to do anything about what they’d learned. So they jumped into action and created Spotfund, a micro-donation app that allows users support different causes through small contributions—at most $3. The app is even gamified: There’s a leaderboard for a user’s “Impact Score,” which increases with every donation you make, or if someone has donated based on something you share. Over 360 nonprofits are working with Spotfund as the app continues to grow in popularity. (via Fast CoExist)

Brazil’s Free School Meal Program Helps Local Farmers Stay In Business

 The 45 million students in Brazilian schools at lunch time aren’t thinking much about where their fresh fruit comes from. But what they don’t know is what makes their meal so innovative: About 70 percent of Brazil’s food comes from small farms around the country that are often not even owned by those who work them. The universal school food program—the world’s largest—helps to keep those farmers in their homes and on their farms. The program works so well that the U.N. even recommends for other countries to catch on. (via Huffington Post)

A Skyscraper Made of Bones: How Biomimicry Could Shape the Cities of the Future

Photo: CityLab

The future of architecture can be found by the seashore. Researchers are studying the use of organic materials like seashells and artificial bone to one day shape the high-rises of cities throughout the world. What they’ve found is that the processes found in nature, like how ants float in water or how leaves self-clean, can give solutions to some of society’s greatest issues. Take bones: The natural formation of bones makes them an ideal material for building because bone, shockingly, is stronger than steel on an ounce-by-ounce basis—and could one day be standing taller than steel high rises in every city. (via CityLab)

Photo header: Fast CoExist

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