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Problem Solving Must Reads: Art to engage blocks in Minneapolis

Plus: Free tampons in NYC schools and collaboration in Cleveland to get kids to college

Problem Solving Must Reads: Art to engage blocks in Minneapolis

Plus: Free tampons in NYC schools and collaboration in Cleveland to get kids to college

Here at The Citizen, we do problem-solving journalism, looking for ideas and solutions to move the region forward and make a better city. Here are some other great ideas for solving the world’s problems, from media outlets around the globe:

“Menstrual Equity” Measures Will Provide NYC Schools With Free Tampons

Photo: GOOD

As many states have been getting rid of “luxury” tariffs on menstruation management products, New York City has provided a helpful spin that will give access to many young women to these products without the high prices. New York City’s local city council passed a measure that will provide free tampons in New York City school bathrooms. Mayor Bill De Blasio’s signature is still necessary for the measure to become law, but free feminine hygiene products will now be accessible to girls from grades 6 through 12. By providing young women with free tampons and sanitary napkin dispensers, disruptions and discomfort can be avoided and the focus of school can stay on learning. (via GOOD)

Reimagining Hennepin Avenue

Attention, Open Streets supporters! Minneapolis’ Hennepin Avenue is being reimagined to turn five blocks of high-traffic roads into a pedestrian-friendly and engaging destination. Artists of every medium are welcomed to submit into open call opportunities to create a better public space for Minnesotans. Through these varying arts (including a mobile stage for live pop-up performances) and partnership with local nonprofits, each block will have an entirely different feel with varying quirks and amenities to change the image of Hennepin Avenue into a destination. (via Made Here Minnesota)

Cleveland School Makes City Its Classroom

In Cleveland, a classroom is more than just a room with four walls. For MC2 STEM High School, the entire city of Cleveland is a classroom. Through collaboration with STEM-related places in the city, students can find themselves learning at General Electric Co., the local science museum or even Cleveland State University’s laboratories. As a result, the school is able to overcome its 85 percent poverty rate and achieve a 97 percent graduation rate, with more than half of their students continuing to college. (via Education Week)

Photo header: Made Here Minnesota

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