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Problem Solving Must-Reads: U.N. Launches First African Bike Share

Plus: the Global Street Design Guide that is setting the new standard for designing urban streets, and how high schoolers are learning aquaponics to feed Earth

Problem Solving Must-Reads: U.N. Launches First African Bike Share

Plus: the Global Street Design Guide that is setting the new standard for designing urban streets, and how high schoolers are learning aquaponics to feed Earth

Bike share programs aren’t just intended to provide an active mode of transportation for moderate distances; they’re also meant to cut down on car usage, thereby reducing carbon emissions and helping to stave off global warming. Despite their prevalence in Western countries, there were no bike shares on the entire African continent. So the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) formulated the idea behind the Medina Bike, holding an auction for various companies to bid on the idea and consequently produce the bike-share.  Smoove, a French firm that specializes in bike-shares all over the globe, won the bidding and teamed up with a local Moroccan business, Estates Vision, to put the plan into action.

Medina Bikes (“medina” means “city” in Arabic) are now available at ten locations within the greater Marrakech area of Morocco.  The launch of the service coincided with the United Nations COP22 Climate Change Conference in Marrakech, which aimed to build the foundation for the enactment of the 2015 Paris Agreement. The hope is for the bike share program to set a new standard for green transit throughout the country and continent.

Morocco is a leader when it comes to climate change.  On top of having the first African bike-share in one of its largest cities, they are also in the process of constructing Noor Solar Power Station, which by 2018, will be the largest solar plant in the world and visible from space. According to Germanwatch and the Climate Action Network, Morocco serves as one of the leading nations in stopping climate change.  The nation plans on generating 52% of its energy from sustainable, renewable resources by the year 2030.

Read the full story here (via City Lab)

Here’s what else we’re reading:

Global Street Design Guide Sets New Standard for Designing Urban Streets

Photo: NACTO

The National Association of City Transportation, with the aid of the Global Designing Cities Initiative and 72 cities in 42 countries, created a new guide to urban street design. The guide hopes to emphasize safety, urban citizens, and sustainable transit infrastructure for the modern city environment. By providing the template, NACTO hopes that more cities can more easily implement better design practices. The guide exhibits 21 typologies and 50 distinct street and intersection models that can be implemented in cities across the world. (via NACTO)

High Schoolers Are Learning Aquaponics to Feed Earth

Photo: GOOD

To accelerate the creation of sustainable food production technologies, Project Feed 1010 is starting at the beginning: In schools. New educational programming in aquaponics combines aquaculture and hydroponics to teach students about this new way of figuring out how to feed our growing population.  PF1010’s mission is to solve how society will feed the growing population, which is estimated to reach 10 billion by 2050.  The high school students learning aquaponics are taking the first step in understanding how it can be automated, improved and democratized for future use. (via GOOD)

Photo header via City Lab

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