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Problem Solving Must-Reads: Seattle’s Flexible Bridge

Plus: New York City learns to channel sunlight, and a Minneapolis startup revolutionizes traditional Muslim clothing

Problem Solving Must-Reads: Seattle’s Flexible Bridge

Plus: New York City learns to channel sunlight, and a Minneapolis startup revolutionizes traditional Muslim clothing

The possibility of a massive earthquake looms forebodingly over Seattle. The city is located just above a fault zone, which, luckily, has been largely quiet. But seismologists are predicting that a 7.2 magnitude earthquake could hit at any time, which could wreak havoc on the majority of the city.

In response to the growing threat, the city is first building a tunnel to replace the old, vulnerable Alaskan Way Viaduct. They’re also going to install a revolutionary flexible bridge that will serve as an on-ramp to the subterranean highway. It will sit on top of the tunnel as an exit ramp from State Route 99, feeding directly into the heart of Seattle. The new bridge is designed to sustain little to no damage as it moves with the earth.

Saiid Siidi at the University of Nevada has been working at the university’s Earthquake Engineering Lab for nearly 16 years, testing the use of new materials instead of typical steel and concrete. In the laboratory, his design has proven to withstand at least 7.5 magnitude earthquakes. Seattle is about to put his design to the true test.

Read the Full Story Here (via GeekWire)

Here’s what else we’re reading:

Sunlight for the Lowline in New York City

Photo: City Lab

The imposing skyline of New York City makes sunlight a hot commodity. That’s why a New York City nonprofit has begun converting an abandoned trolley terminal into an underground park entirely illuminated by natural light. The project employs high-tech system of solar panels, windows, and reflective tubes to channel sunlight into the one-acre long subterranean space dubbed “The Lowline.” (via City Lab)

The "Athletic Hijab" Normalizes Exercise for Muslim Women

Photo: Good Sports

Muslim women have trouble engaging in athletics due to the restrictive nature of the hijab, the traditional Islamic headscarf. A Minneapolis startup called Asiya has developed an “athletic hijab” to enable students to be active without the discomfort they would otherwise experience wearing a typical version of the garment. One of the co-founders of Asiya, Fatimah Hussein, has been testing out the products at a local community center, where it has proven quite successful. (via Good Sports)

Photo header: CityLab

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