NEWSLETTER SIGNUP

By signing up to our newsletter, you agree to our terms.

Charles Barkley’s Black History Month All-Stars

The former NBA great highlights a month's worth of Philadelphia's African American heroes

[Editor’s Note: Last year, to mark Black History Month we introduced you every day to Charles Barkley’s Philadelphia Black History Month All-Stars. We are running them again this year, as a reminder of those African American Philadelphians whose work still inspires, sometimes centuries later.]

I speak at a lot of schools across the country, and I’ve encountered a trend that drives me freakin’ nuts. I always ask students the following question: “How many of you want to be a professional athlete or a rapper?”

At inner-city, mostly African American schools, nearly every hand shoots up. When I ask the same question in a white suburban school, maybe 10 percent of hands are raised. I speak to a lot of schools, and this happens without fail.

I tell black kids all the time, “You ain’t gonna be me.” Even if you’re any good on the court, the odds are stacked against you. But I can tell from the blank way they look back at me: They’re putting all their eggs in this totally unlikely basket. But I get why. Young black kids get from the media an unrealistic picture of African American success. Athletes and rappers, with Denzel and Oprah thrown in.

Many of these All-Stars didn’t make it into the history books or even the newspapers of their time. But their stories are inspiring and worth knowing.

Guion Bluford

Astronaut/Scientist
(born November 22, 1942)

Guion Bluford astronautThe first African American to go into space is Philadelphia’s own Bluford, 73, who grew up here before earning an aerospace engineering degree from Penn State through the Air Force ROTC program. After flying 144 combat missions in Vietnam, Bluford became the first African American NASA astronaut in 1979, eventually going into space on the Challenger and Discovery. Bluford logged over 28 days in space and 5,100 hours on different fighter pilots. “I’ve come to appreciate the planet we live on,” Bluford said. “It’s a small ball in a large universe. It’s a very fragile ball but also very beautiful. You don’t recognize that until you see it from a little farther off.” After his retirement, Bluford joined private industry, eventually becoming president of Aerospace Technology, an engineering consulting firm. (Read more about Bluford here)

Charlotte Forten Grimké

Writer/Teacher
(August 17, 1837- July 23, 1914)

Charlotte Forten Grimké teacher educatorBorn into a wealthy family that valued both intellect and activism, Charlotte Forten Grimké was always eager to educate and engage a deprived African American community. She was the first black northerner to go south and teach former slaves. It was during the Civil War, on union-occupied St. Helena Island, where Forten taught ex-slaves as part of the Port Royal Experiment. While there, she struggled to connect with the islanders who hardly spoke English and who struggled following the daily routines of school. Nevertheless, once she detailed her experiences in an article published by Atlantic Monthly, more schools started popping up in the south for African Americans. She was also an avid writer and kept journals that have drawn attention for their insightful take on America during and after slavery. (Read more about Grimké here)

Nathan Francis Mossell

Physician
(July 27, 1856 – October 27, 1946)

Nathan Francis Mossell doctor physicianNathan Francis Mossell was a pioneer physician who established the first black private hospital in Philadelphia, Frederick Douglass Memorial Hospital and Training School, that both treated African Americans and trained black nurses and doctors. Uncle to All Star Sadie Mossell Alexander, he was the first African American to graduate from the University of Pennsylvania medical school, and the first to join the Philadelphia County Medical Society. Mossell was also an activist, founding the Philadelphia chapter of the NAACP, and joining W.E.B. DuBois’s Niagara Movement. Mossell left his papers to Penn, including his autobiography in which he writes, “It is plain therefore, that prior to the Civil War, the so-called free colored people had few, if any, rights that the white man felt bound to respect. This mental attitude on his part, so hampered the colored people’s ideas of themselves that it still shrouds their efforts to attain a more inclusive legal franchise for themselves.” (Read more about Mossell here)

Caroline Still Anderson

Physician
(November 1, 1848 – June 1 or 2, 1919)

Caroline Still Anderson physician doctorThe daughter of abolitionists, Anderson graduated as the youngest in her class and earned her B.A. at 19. She taught elocution, drawing and music until 1875, when he decided she wanted to go into medical school. After initially being rejected because of her race for an internship at Boston’s New England Hospital for Women and Children, Anderson went in person and awed the board, who unanimously voted to hire her. She returned to Philly, opened her own dispensary and medical practice, and then began teaching hygiene and public speaking. She also opened her own liberal arts school Berean Manual Training and Industrial School that was praised by W.E.B. DuBois, along with her other work for the black community in Philadelphia. Anderson wrote in a letter to her husband before attending medical school, “I am tired of being so situated as to accomplish so little either for myself or anybody else.” (Read more about Anderson here)

Leon Sullivan

Civil Rights Leader
(October 16, 1922- April 24, 2001)

Leon Sullivan civil rights leaderRev. Leon Sullivan—the “lion of Zion”—used his pulpit and his position as longtime pastor of North Philly’s Zion Baptist Church to organize for local African American causes, particularly in employment. From 1959 to 1963, Sullivan led area black preachers in organizing “selective patronage” boycotts of local companies—Tasty Baking, Sun Oil, Gulf—deemed to discriminate against African Americans in their hiring, urging black consumers with the slogan “Don’t buy where you don’t work.” The movement opened up several thousand jobs to black workers and drew national attention, including that of Martin Luther King, Jr, who adopted Sullivan’s techniques in his Operation Breadbasket. In 1964, Sullivan opened the first Opportunity Industrial Center, a job-service training program to teach manufacturing skills to black Philadelphians. OIC still operates today, in 22 states and around the globe. Sullivan led Zion for 40 years, growing it from 600 congregants to 6,000, turning it into a community hub (the center still bears his name). Throughout, he also spent time in South Africa helping to fight and dismantle apartheid and creating a set of rules—now dubbed the ‘Sullivan Principles’ —that serve as guidelines for American corporations doing business in South Africa. He recalled in a 1999 interview a trip to South Africa that ended with him enduring a strip search at the airport. “A man with the biggest .45 I’d ever seen said, ‘We do to you what we have to,’” Sullivan recalled to the New York Times. “I stood there in my underwear, thinking, ‘I’m the head of the largest black church in Philadelphia and I’m on the board of directors of General Motors. When I get home, I’ll do to you what I have to.’” (Read more about Sullivan here)

Alain Leroy Locke

Writer, ‘Dean’ of Harlem Renaissance
(September 13, 1885 – June 9, 1954)

Alain Leroy Locke Writer, ‘Dean’ of Harlem RenaissanceA writer and philosopher, Alain Leroy Locke is considered the philosophical architect of the Harlem Renaissance, a less widely-known—but no less important—figure than stars Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes. The first African American Rhodes scholar (and last to be selected until 1960), Locke graduated from Central High School and then Harvard University. Despite his talents, even in England Locke faced adversity. Gay and black, Locke was rejected from many schools once he arrived at Oxford University because of his race, and had trouble finding work once he returned home. But he triumphed, teaching and leading at Howard University for 42 years. Sixty years after his death, his ashes were buried in the Congressional Cemetery in 2013, where his tombstone reads: “1885–1954 Herald of the Harlem Renaissance Exponent of Cultural Pluralism” (Read more about Locke here)

The Philadelphia Citizen will only publish thoughtful, civil posts. We want to be a communal space. But that doesn’t mean you have a First Amendment right to be an idiot. Send us an insulting, offensive and/or wildly off-topic comment and not only will we refrain from posting it -- we will laugh at you before we hit delete.

Recent Tweets
@THEPHILACITIZEN

@thephilacitizen @@thephilacitizen
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
Closing the generation—and employment—gap with the Refugee Urban Farm in South Philly. https://t.co/66wwl275Om 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
WURD's @Cdellison takes on Tuesday's voter turnout, which, while a bit better, is hardly anything to celebrate: https://t.co/aakojzyImf 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
North Philly mom of seven wins The Citizen's $5,000 Voter Lottery. Watch the giveaway: https://t.co/ftiIihhsAu 🙌🏾 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
J.P. Romney on how Philly's bizarro ward system affects the way we vote: https://t.co/AOX4bULRhA #yourcitydefined 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
Larry Platt on the archaic system we use to elect judges: https://t.co/FShpXjewIp 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
Stop all the back-patting. We just let 11 percent of the city’s population tell us what to do and how to live: https://t.co/aakojzyImf 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
We’re Hiring! Join our team as a Special Events Coordinator. #JobsPHL https://t.co/qi2XBvUtNA 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
Using a Shark Tank format, Penn students pitch their social innovation projects that they think could improve PHL: https://t.co/6FmjpsPgxT 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
Really? Turnout was good? We just let 11 percent of the city’s population tell us what to do and how to live 🤔… https://t.co/7cf36HVKWk 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
HEADS UP: @BeautifulPHL is awarding 5 $1K minigrants to local orgs committed to combating cigarette litter. Details: https://t.co/ZDTjtvJdOz 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
RT @Commish_Schmidt:Here's an updated look at voter turnout in recent District Attorney/City Controller Primary Elections in Philadelph… https://t.co/5RzU6yJQit 
The Citizen
@thephilacitizen
.@mompopsphilly signs massive national deal, delivering even more popsicles to kids with dietary issues:… https://t.co/SBLVMXbVsa 

LOAD MORE

Be a Citizen Editor

Suggest a Story